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Blackwell’s Collection Manager and the INNOPAC MARC Loader: Tools for Designing Efficient Acquisitions Workflows

Coordinator:
Marylou Colver, Blackwell’s Book Services
Presenters:
Eric Redman, Blackwell’s Book Services
Virginia Scheschy, University of Nevada, Reno


Collection Manager was developed by Blackwell’s as a Web interface that connects librarians and Blackwell’s New Titles System to allow the viewing of a library’s respective profile of collection development policies and interests.

Librarians may view individual titles that match their profiles. Each title in Collection Manager is annotated to indicate the status of the item in the database. Information is available to determine why a specific approval action was taken for each new title. The product has been enhanced to accommodate keyword searching.

Workflow between Blackwell’s Collection Manager and the INNOPAC online system was showcased after the design and theory behind the Collection Manager was discussed.

The concept of Collection Manager began in January of 1996, with the goal of putting library approval plan profiles online so that customers could view them and make changes online, if necessary. In preparation for the development of Collection Manager, Blackwell’s examined the workflow from beginning to end. Navigation tools of the Collection Manager facilitates the process of sending data to the INNOPAC MARC Loader. The loader profile that Collection Manager uses is based on a document supplied by Innovative that describes where the vendors should put local ordering information in the MARC record.

Additional acquisitions features that will also be available in June of 1998 include:

  1. The ability to determine why a form was supplied instead of the actual books.
  2. The ability to view, open, or approve orders.
  3. The ability to limit by fund code, requester, date, etc.

Once titles are marked as requests, the acquisitions staff can approve or reject the order. If it is approved, a MARC file of these titles can be exported and stored on Blackwell’s servers. The library can then connect to Blackwell’s server and ftp the file to their respective systems. A future enhancement will be the ability to tie in full MARC services to Collection Manager.

Virginia Scheschy then discussed the workflow of Collection Manager from the INNOPAC side as used at the University of Nevada, Reno. She reviewed the Collection Manager as it exists today and explained the MARC loader program (without invoice) to determine what specific data Blackwell and INNOPAC could supply. There is a good possibility that the INNOPAC MARC Loader software can receive variable length field data as well as fixed field data. This is especially useful for fields such as “selector” and/or “requestor.” The workflow as summarized by Virginia includes:

  1. Display of New Titles Lists.
  2. Limit list by specified criteria.
  3. Decide to acquire, hold for later review, or request acquisition.
  4. Input quantity, fund, and/or department order information.

The Collection Manager is designed to work in conjunction with the INNOPAC software and works quite well. There were over 50 persons in attendance, which illustrated the interest that librarians have regarding incorporating more efficient workflows into their operations. Once the new features of Collection Manager are incorporated, it should make a significant impact on all aspects of technical services and the library in general.


Recorded by: Euthena Newman, North Carolina A&T State University

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