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  1. Tasha Bales
  2. Sierra/ Millennium/ Encore
  3. Thursday, 15 December 2016
  4.  Subscribe via email
We are considering various options for exporting and saving monthly Acquisitions reports that may be more efficient that what we are doing now (sending via "email printer";).

One option is to use the "file save printer", which creates an output file in Data Exchange with the *.p file extension. This works fine, as we can change the file extension to *.txt. However, most staff would probably attempt to open the file in Notepad, and would find the file difficult to read; the contents, including columns and whitespace, render appropriately only in Notepad++. Saving as UTF-8 doesn't help.

Is there a trick for exporting *.p files from Millennium, and being able to open and view them more or less as they would be formatted when viewed in Millennium. This seems like a reasonable expectation to me.

If all else fails, we will avoid using the file save printer, and will instead copy/paste from Millennium to Word/Google Docs, etc. File save would be the most efficient option if I could guarantee the output would render the same regardless of what text editor is used to view it.

Thanks for your time and consideration. I'm sure this is a very basic question, but computer science is not my forte.
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Amey Park recently posted very clear directions on how to do this (view in Excel) on the Sierra listserv - http://listserv.iii.com/read/messages?id=477731. Here are her directions...


1. Create the list.
2. Choose Export Records.
3. Fill out the information you want to export. (e.g., .b#, title, author, etc.)
4. Field delimiter -- click on Select Control character - 9
5. OK
6. Text qualifier -- None
7. Repeated Field Delimiter ;
8. Max Field length None
9. Browse -- type a name. Use the .txt extension
10. Save [I save to my downloads folder]
11. OK

Excel
Open the Excel.txt file [Start up Excel and look for the file you downloaded. Change the box to look for "All Files", not just Excel files.]

1. Choose Delimited
2. ** Use the “File Origin” dropdown to select Unicode (UTF-8) so diacritics will display correctly.
3. Next
4. Delimiters box - select
5. Tab
6. Text qualifier box - select None
7. Next
8. Column data format - text
9. Finish

Note
If you're importing a barcode, in Excel change the "Number" tab to "Number".
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  1. Guest
  2. 3 years ago
  3. #581
I have considered that we may just need to encourage folks to use Notepad++.

On the one hand, I feel like it is reasonable to expect, even on Millennium, that an exported print file should be easy to open and interpret, and for this reason, thought someone may have found a solution long before Notepad++ around. Honestly, I was sure that I was just out-of-the-loop with regards to this situation.

Since relatively few staff may be viewing the exported files, using Notepad++ may be the best solution, as IT would need to individually meet with folks to install the app and make it the default text editor (exceptions we try to avoid). In my environment, I've noticed that sometimes inefficient, but familiar, workarounds are often preferred to new approaches, and this partly explains my inquiry.

Thanks for your time.
  1. Guest
  2. 3 years ago
  3. #573
What is the drawback to having folks use Notepad++? Just not as used to using it?
  1. Guest
  2. 3 years ago
  3. #572
Thanks Alison. I'm familiar with that process, however I'm doing something a bit different. Instead of exporting records from Create Lists, for instance, I'm working with an Acquisitions report that is "printed" to the File Save printer and then exported from Data Exchange. I've tried importing the file into Excel, but that did not produce the results I am looking for.

I suspect the "problem" is related to encoding. I am not sure why Notepad++ renders the report accurately (preserves whitespace/columns), but Notepad and other programs do not (I've tried to find the answer, but was unsuccessful).

Thanks for your time.
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. Sierra/ Millennium/ Encore
  3. # 1
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We can open a .p file on Microsoft Word or Excel. While the .p formatting isn't great, the file can be easily read and printed from these two applications. Have you tried opening the file in Excel or Word?
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. Sierra/ Millennium/ Encore
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